Ardi Dental
Dr. Bobby Gajendran

Extractions..

Simple Tooth Extraction

Simple Tooth Extraction

If a tooth hasn’t been broken off too much to be visible in the mouth, a simple extraction will suffice. This procedure requires only local anesthetic, as well as nitrous oxide gas depending on the patient.

The procedure is fairly quick, as the dentist will merely grip and loosen your tooth with forceps before pulling it out. Sometimes it is necessary to insert a dental elevator between the tooth and gum to assist in loosening the tooth.

After your tooth extraction, you will need to follow some steps for a quick recovery. Take the pain medication prescribed by your dentist exactly as directed and avoid eating solid foods for several hours afterward. Avoid chewing on that side of your mouth for a full day, because getting food in the extraction site can cause complications like dry socket. Rinsing your mouth with salt water and using warm compresses on your jaw will help keep your mouth healthy and control pain.

Surgical Tooth Extraction

Surgical Tooth Extraction

In cases where the tooth cannot be seen in the mouth due to breakage or simply not coming in yet (as is the case with many people’s wisdom teeth), your dentist will have to perform a surgical tooth extraction. The procedure may involve local or general anesthesia depending on the particulars of your case.

 In this circumstance,most of the pts are refered to an oral surgeon.

Dental Implants

Dental Implants The procedure of placing implants involve taking X-rays and impressions (molds) of the jaw and teeth to determine bone, gum tissue, and spacing available for an implant. While the area is numb, the implant will be surgically placed into the bone and allowed to heal and integrate itself onto the bone for up to six months. Depending on the type of implant, a second surgery may be required in order to place the “post” that will hold the artificial tooth in placeAfter several weeks of healing the artificial teeth are made and fitted to the post portion of the anchor. Because several fittings may be required, this step may take one to two months to complete. After a healing period, the artificial teeth are securely attached to the implant, providing excellent stability and comfort to the patient.
You will receive care instructions when your treatment is completed. Good oral hygiene, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new implant.

Nitrous Oxide Sedation

Nitrous Oxide or "Laughing Gas" is one of the safest forms of sedation available and can take the anxiety out of most routine dental procedures to include cleanings. Non-allergenic and non-irritating, most feel the onset effects within minutes and these effects are completely reversed within about 5 minutes of gas termination. This complete reversal allows you to safely drive home or go to work right after your appointment!
.We can vary the depth of sedation depending on your level of anxiety. The gas also tends to reduce gag reflexes and saliva flow. Most importantly, you will bask in a feeling of relaxation as we care for you.

The gas is administered through a simple rubber hood that rests on your nose providing a feeling of numbness, security, and warmth. If you are known to be claustrophobic, this might not be the choice for you. At or near the end of your treatment, we will provide you with 100% oxygen so you will feel completely normal within 5-10 minutes. At that point, you are 100% ready to independently carry on your life.

Dental emergencies
Avulsed tooth (tooth knocked out)

If a tooth has been knocked clean out of the mouthHere are some steps to take:

  1. Call the dentist.
  2. Pick up the tooth by the crown and rinse it under warm water. DO NOT touch the root.
  3. If possible, place it back into its socket – if not tuck it into the cheek pouch.
  4. If the tooth cannot be placed in the mouth, put the tooth into a cup of milk, saliva, or water as a last resort. It is important to keep the tooth from drying out.
  5. Get to the dentist, quickly and safely.

The dentist will try to replace the tooth in its natural socket. In some cases, the tooth will reattach, but if the inner mechanisms of the teeth are seriously damaged, root canal therapy may be necessary.

Lost filling or crown

Usually, a crown or filling comes loose while eating. Once it is out of the mouth, the affected tooth may be incredibly sensitive to temperature changes and pressure. Crowns generally become loose because the tooth beneath is decaying. The decay causes shape changes in the teeth – meaning that the crown no longer fits.

If a crown has dropped out of the mouth, make a dental appointment as soon as possible. Keep the crown in a cool, safe place because there is a possibility that the dentist can reinsert it. If the crown is out of the mouth for a long period of time, the teeth may shift or sustain further damage.
When the dentist is not immediately accessible, here are the steps to take:

  1. Apply clove oil to the tooth to alleviate pain.
  2. Clean the crown and affix it onto the tooth with dental cement. This can be purchased at the local pharmacy.
  3. If the crown is lost, smear the top of the tooth with dental cement to alleviate discomfort.
  4. DO NOT use any kind of glue to affix the crown.

The dentist will check the crown to see if it still fits. If it does, it will be reattached to the tooth. Where decay is noted, this will be treated and a new crown will be made.

Cracked or broken teeth

Where a segment of tooth has been broken off, here are some steps that can be taken at home:

  1. Call the dentist.
  2. Rinse the tooth fragment and the mouth with lukewarm water.
  3. Apply gauze to the area for ten minutes if there is bleeding.
  4. Place a cold, damp dishtowel on the cheek to minimize swelling and pain.
  5. Cover the affected area with over-the-counter dental cement if there is no way to see the dentist immediately.
  6. Take a topical pain reliever.

The nature of the break or fracture will limit what the dentist is able to do. If a fracture or crack extends into the root, root canal therapy may be the only effective way to retain the tooth. In the case of a complete break, the dentist will usually affix the fragment back onto the tooth as a temporary measure.

Dislodged/loose teeth

When a tooth has been dislodged or loosened from its socket by trauma or decay, it might be possible to save it. If the tooth remains in the mouth and attached to the blood vessels and nerves, there is a good chance root canal therapy will not be necessary.

It is important to call the dentist immediately to make an appointment. In the meantime, use a cold compress and over-the-counter medications to relieve pain. The dentist will reposition the tooth and add splints to stabilize it. If the tooth fails to heal, root canal therapy may be required.
If you have questions or concerns about dental emergencies, please contact your dentist.

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